May 2019 Starred Reviews

May 2019 stars tally:

  • 606 books published in 2019 have been awarded 962 starred reviews as of the end of March. 2 books have 6 starred reviews, 5 books have 5 starred reviews, 30 books have 4 starred reviews, 53 books have 3 starred reviews, 130 books have 2 starred reviews, 386 books have 1 starred review.
  • No new books with 6 starred reviews; 1 book moves up to 5 starred reviews from  4 starred reviews; 3 books with 4 starred reviews are new and 8 books move up to 4 starred reviews from 3 starred reviews; 22 books have been added with 3 starred reviews

Continue reading May 2019 Starred Reviews

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April 2019 Starred Reviews

Yes, you’re reading that right – this is just the April starred reviews list. I’ll be skipping the April Newbery and Printz updates in favor of moving right into entering May starred reviews in the spreadsheet.

April 2019 stars tally:

  • 511 books published in 2019 have been awarded 794 starred reviews as of the end of March. 2 books have 6 starred reviews, 4 books have 5 starred reviews, 20 books have 4 starred reviews, 39 books have 3 starred reviews, 119 books have 2 starred reviews, 327 books have 1 starred review.
  • No new books with 6 starred reviews; 1 book moves up to 5 starred reviews from  4 starred reviews, 4 titles with 4 starred reviews are new; 9 titles have been added with 3 starred reviews

Continue reading April 2019 Starred Reviews

Newbery Contender Update graphic

2020 Newbery Possibilities through March Stars

Here’s my very late March roundup of Newbery titles. Please keep in mind this isn’t taking into account April and May stars. I’ll be adding those to the spreadsheet soon (I hope). I will probably skip April Printz and Newbery updates and just do one for each of those that covers both April and May together.

For this blog’s purposes, contenders have three or more starred reviews and are broken down into these lists: Middle Grade Fiction, Young Adult Fiction, Comics, Non-Fiction, Picture Books (Fiction and Non-Fiction), Easy Readers/Early Chapter Books, and Ineligibles.

Standard disclaimer: I am not affiliated with the Newbery committee and I have no knowledge of their official rulings on eligibility – I’m making my best guesses based on the terms and criteria and internet searches regarding citizenship/residency. For a more thorough breakdown of the criteria you can see my first Newbery post of the year or just go read the official word from ALSC.

As of the end of March there were 52 titles with three or more starred reviews which means there are 11 new books listed here. Lists are after the jump. Continue reading 2020 Newbery Possibilities through March Stars

Printz Contender Update graphic

2020 Printz Possibilities through March Stars

“The hurrier I go, the behinder I get.” I’m really feeling Carroll’s White Rabbit and this quote this Spring, but here’s the March update for Printz contenders based on starred reviews. For information about criteria please see my first Printz post for this year or check out the official Printz criteria page.

52 (11 new this month) books have three starred reviews or more as of the end of March 2019. 21 (5 new) of those are picture books, poetry collections or novels with an audience that doesn’t fit the Printz age range so aren’t mentioned here at all. 14 (2 new) are young adult novels, 1 is a young adult comic; 4 (1 new) are young adult non-fiction; 9 (2 new) are younger novel outliers and 3 (1 new) are other outliers.

The organization paragraph that repeats each month: This year I’ve organized contenders by format: Novels, Comics, Non-Fiction. There’s two outliers lists – one for younger novels and one for anything else (essay collections, short stories, younger comics, etc.). I’m still not including titles that end at age 12 for their review ranges (i.e ages 8-12) unless I’ve heard Printz buzz about them. To see why I stick with three starred reviews despite this year’s winners not justifying that, see this old Someday My Printz post. Continue reading 2020 Printz Possibilities through March Stars

March 2019 Starred Reviews

March 2019 stars tally:

  • 421 books published in 2019 have been awarded 649 starred reviews as of the end of March. 2 books have 6 starred reviews, 3 books have 5 starred reviews, 17 books have 4 starred reviews, 30 books have 3 starred reviews, 95 books have 2 starred reviews, 274 books have 1 starred review.
  • On the Come Up and Shout both move up to 6 starred reviews; 1 book is new with 5 starred reviews and 1 book moves up to 5 starred reviews from 3 starred reviews, 2 titles with 4 starred reviews are new with 5 titles moving up from 3 stars; 8 titles have been added with 3 starred reviews

Continue reading March 2019 Starred Reviews

Printz Contender Update graphic

2020 Printz Possibilities through February Stars

Time to update the list of Printz contenders for February starred reviews. For information about criteria please see my first Printz post for this year or check out the official Printz criteria page.

This year I’ve organized contenders by format: Novels, Comics, Non-Fiction. There’s two outliers lists – one for younger novels and one for anything else (essay collections, short stories, younger comics, etc.). I’m still not including titles that end at age 12 for their review ranges (i.e ages 8-12) unless I’ve heard Printz buzz about them. To see why I stick with three starred reviews despite this year’s winners not justifying that, see this old Someday My Printz post.

41 books have three starred reviews or more as of the end of February 2019. 16 of those are picture books or novels with an audience that doesn’t fit the Printz age range so aren’t mentioned here at all. 12 are young adult novels, 1 is a young adult comic; 3 are young adult non-fiction; 7 are younger novel outliers and 2 are other outliers.
Continue reading 2020 Printz Possibilities through February Stars

Newbery Contender Update graphic

2020 Newbery Possibilities through February Stars

A nasty cold knocked me out for half of March so this post is much later than I had hoped. On the bright side – Heavy Medal has its first set of suggestions up ! Go see what their readers have recommended should be on your radar for the Newbery this year and watch for their next post soliciting suggestions – it should be up very soon .

For this blog’s purposes, contenders have three or more starred reviews and are broken down into these lists: Middle Grade Fiction, Young Adult Fiction, Comics, Non-Fiction, Picture Books (Fiction and Non-Fiction), Easy Readers/Early Chapter Books, and Ineligibles.

Two titles have me in a bit of a quandary over eligibility – The Iliad adapted by Gareth Hinds and The Undefeated by Kwame Alexander. Neither is a super likely contender – The Iliad is a graphic adaptation and only barely hits the upper limit of the Newbery age range while The Undefeated is a picture book. My question on both rests on Newbery Definition #5 which regards “original work.” The Iliad might not be eligible depending on how much the text has been rewritten or adapted (From Newbery Definition #5: “Original work” means that the text was created by this writer and no one else. It may include original retellings of traditional literature, provided the words are the author’s own.). The Undefeated looks like it was originally presented as spoken word poetry in a video for ESPN’s The Undefeated website. Newbery Definition #5 continues: “Further, “original work” means that the text is presented here for the first time and has not been previously published elsewhere in this or any other form.  Text reprinted or compiled from other sources are not eligible. Abridgements are not eligible.” Where do video and performance fit in this criteria? The definition specifically says text – does that mean only the written word? Right now I lean toward The Iliad being ineligible and The Undefeated being eligible and they are noted as such below, but if anyone has any insight into whether they are eligible or not, please share in the comments!

Standard disclaimer: I am not affiliated with the Newbery committee and I have no knowledge of their official rulings on eligibility – I’m making my best guesses based on the terms and criteria and internet searches regarding citizenship/residency. For a more thorough breakdown of the criteria you can see my first Newbery post of the year or just go read the official word from ALSC.

As of the end of February there were 41 titles with three or more starred reviews which means there are 19 new books listed here. Lists are after the jump. Continue reading 2020 Newbery Possibilities through February Stars

February 2019 Starred Reviews

I always feel a tension this time of year between reading last year’s titles that I’ve missed and wanting to get on top of this year’s releases. I’m almost done with Pay Attention, Carter Jones and am listening to On the Come Up in the car. I’ve also got New Kid at home because several people have recommended that as one to watch. From the recent awards, I listened to Merci Suárez Changes Gears and found it be excellent and am enjoying The Parker Inheritance which I’m listening to at home via hoopla. For the last several years I’ve participated in YALSA’s Hub Challenge and despite only actually finishing once, I’m going to give it a go again this year hoping that will help me catch up on award winners I’ve missed. I’ll be tracking on Goodreads and on Litsy (@Bkwrm7) What are you reading? Anyone else have a reading challenge they’re hoping to try?

February 2019 stars tally:

  • 317 books published in 2019 have been awarded 483 starred reviews as of the end of February. 2 books have 5 starred reviews, 11 books have 4 starred reviews, 28 books have 3 starred reviews, 69 books have 2 starred reviews, 207 books have 1 starred review.
  • On the Come Up is new with 5 starred reviews (and spoiler alert – Horn Book has starred it in their March/April issue so it will move up to 6 starred reviews next month), 2 titles with 4 starred reviews are new with 1 title moving up from 3 stars; 16 titles have been added with 3 starred reviews

Continue reading February 2019 Starred Reviews

Printz Contender Update graphic

2020 Printz Possibilities through January Stars

Time for a new crop of Printz contenders! Here’s your annual reminder of the Printz criteria:

The Michael L. Printz Award annually honors the best book written for teens, based entirely on its literary merit, each year. – YALSA Website

Two additional eligibility notes:

  • Must be published between January 1 and December 31 by a United States publishing house. Works previously published in other countries are eligible the year they are published in the U.S.
  • Must have been designated by the publisher as a young adult book or within YALSA’s stated audience range of 12-18 years.

You can find the full policies and procedures here.

I’m taking a page from how I’ve been organizing my Newbery posts and breaking contenders down by format: Novels, Comics, Non-Fiction. Now there’s two outliers lists – one for younger novels and one for anything else (essay collections, short stories, younger comics, etc.). I’m still not going to include titles that end at age 12 for their review ranges (i.e ages 8-12) unless I’ve heard Printz buzz about them. To see why I stick with three starred reviews despite this year’s winners not justifying that, see this old Someday My Printz post. Maybe I’ll have a chance sometime this year to revisit that data, but in the meantime lists are after the break!

22 books have three starred reviews or more as of the end of January 2019. 9 of those are picture books or novels with an audience that doesn’t fit the Printz age range so aren’t mentioned here at all. 7 are young adult novels, no young adult comics; 3 young adult non-fiction; 1 outlier of a younger novel and 2 other outliers.
Continue reading 2020 Printz Possibilities through January Stars

Newbery Contender Update graphic

2020 Newbery Possibilities through January Stars

The dust may have barely settled from this year’s American Library Association’s Youth Media Awards, but I’m already looking towards next year. With January reviews in the books, we have several contenders so let’s review the criteria. The Newbery Award is given by the Association for Library Service to Children to

“the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children published by an American publisher in the United States in English during the preceding year.” – Newbery Medal Terms and Criteria

That’s a pretty broad charge for the committee, so here’s a few more details:

  • Children are defined as being up to and including the age of 14.
  • Books must be published in the U.S. first; titles originally published elsewhere are not eligible.
  • The author must be a U.S. citizen or resident.

The 2019 Newbery committee named three middle grade novels – a much more traditional slate than has appeared in awhile. It will be interesting to see what the 2020 committee feels is distinguished. I liked breaking the contenders down by format, so I’m keeping that this year. However, I’m adding the publication date to entries this year to make it easy to see what’s accessible to the general public when. The lists will be pretty much the same as last year: Middle Grade Fiction, Young Adult Fiction, Comics, Non-Fiction, Picture Books (Fiction and Non-Fiction), and Easy Readers/Early Chapter Books.

The final list is books that I think are ineligible – usually it’s because the author isn’t a U.S. citizen or resident, but wordless picture books and titles with previously published content could appear here as well. Disclaimer: I am not affiliated with the Newbery committee and I have no knowledge of their official rulings on eligibility – I’m making my best guesses based on the terms and criteria and internet searches regarding citizenship/residency.

The 2019 winner and honors did all have three or more stars (you can see more about that on my YMA Results post). For those who follow the Newbery Award and enjoy trying to guess contenders, starred reviews are just one way to identify possible contenders. Each journal has a different criteria for what becomes a starred review and none of those criteria match the criteria for the Newbery Award. Heavy Medal’s feature where readers can nominate titles will be returning in March. Their blog is a great place to see more in depth discussion of how titles meet or don’t meet the Newbery criteria. As always remember that however many books we on the sidelines read, it’s a rare mock participant who will have read as widely as the actual committee members.

As of the end of January there were 22 titles with three or more starred reviews. Lists are after the jump. Continue reading 2020 Newbery Possibilities through January Stars